Apache Beam

beam.apache.org

Concept

  • Batch and Streaming are “the same code”
  • A pipeline model

Mentions

Cultures

  • Java
  • Python

Code

Documentation

Alignments

Background

Okay, WTF is Ethereum | Motherboard

Okay, WTF Is Ethereum?; Daniel Oberhaus; , Jordan Pearson; In Motherboard; 2017-06-16.
Teaser: A beginner’s guide to the world’s second most popular cryptocurrency.

Mentions

Also

  • worldwide supercomputer
  • decentralized microservices
  • link

Actualities

Vitalik Buterin, inventor of Ethereum. Image: Wikimedia Commons.

Referenced

Previously

In Motherboard

How to Avoid Going to Jail under 18 U.S.C. Section 1001 for Lying to Government Agents | FindLaw

How to Avoid Going to Jail under 18 U.S.C. Section 1001 for Lying to Government Agents Solomon L. Wisenbert; In FindLaw; 2017-05? (undated).
Solomon L. Wisenberg is a partner and co-chair of the white collar criminal defense practice group of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, LLP.


18 U.S.C. § 1001 – U.S. Code – Unannotated Title 18. Crimes and Criminal Procedure § 1001. Statements or entries generally

Except as otherwise provided in this section, whoever, in any matter within the jurisdiction of the executive, legislative, or judicial branch of the Government of the United States, knowingly and willfully–

  • falsifies, conceals, or covers up by any trick, scheme, or device a material fact;
  • makes any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or representation;  or
  • makes or uses any false writing or document knowing the same to contain any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or entry;

shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 5 years or, if the offense involves international or domestic terrorism (as defined in section 2331), imprisoned not more than 8 years, or both.  If the matter relates to an offense under chapter 109A, 109B, 110, or 117, or section 1591, then the term of imprisonment imposed under this section shall be not more than 8 years.

  • Subsection (a) does not apply to a party to a judicial proceeding, or that party’s counsel, for statements, representations, writings or documents submitted by such party or counsel to a judge or magistrate in that proceeding.
  • With respect to any matter within the jurisdiction of the legislative branch, subsection (a) shall apply only to–
  •  administrative matters, including a claim for payment, a matter related to the procurement of property or services, personnel or employment practices, or support services, or a document required by law, rule, or regulation to be submitted to the Congress or any office or officer within the legislative branch;  or
  • any investigation or review, conducted pursuant to the authority of any committee, subcommittee, commission or office of the Congress, consistent with applicable rules of the House or Senate.

Making Privacy Concrete (Three Words Not Usually Found Together) | NSTIC

Making Privacy Concrete (Three Words Not Usually Found Together); nstic a.k.a. Sean Brooks, Mike Garcia, Naomi Lefkovitz, Suzanne Lightman, Ellen Nadeau; In Some Blog of Gov Delivery; 2017-01-04.

NIST-IR 8062, An Introduction to Privacy Engineering and Risk Management, Sean Brooks, Mike Garcia, Naomi Lefkovitz, Suzanne Lightman, Ellen Nadeau; NIST Internal Report; National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Department of Commerce, United States, 2017-01; 49 pages; NIST.IR.8062

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

  1. Introduction
    1. Purpose and Scope
    2. Audience
    3. Organization of this Document
  2. An Engineering Approach to Privacy
    1. The Relationship Between Information Security and Privacy
    2. Privacy Problems and Systems
    3. Defining Privacy Engineering
      1. 1 The Applicability of Systems Engineering
      2. 2 The Utility of Risk Management
  3. Components for Privacy Engineering in Federal Systems
    1. Introducing Privacy Engineering Objectives
      1. Privacy Engineering Objectives and the FIPPs
        1. 1.1 Predictability
        2. 1.2 Manageability
        3. 1.3 Disassociability
    2. Introducing a Privacy Risk Model
      1. 1 Privacy Risk Factors
      2. 2 Privacy Risk Characteristics
        1. 2.1 Data Actions
        2. 2.2 PII
        3. 2.3 Context
  4. Roadmap for Federal Guidance for Privacy Engineering and Risk Management

Appendices

Appendix A: NIST Development Process
Appendix B: Glossary
Appendix C: Acronyms
Appendix D: References
Appendix E: Examples of Non-Data Breach Privacy Concerns
Appendix F: The Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs)

OpenRTB v2.5 | IAB

OpenRTB 2.3.1 (PDF)
Provides an update to the specification addressing two typos:

  • Section 3.2.13 – In the user object, the buyer ID attribute has been corrected to “buyeruid.”
  • Section 4.4 – The ${AUCTION_BID_ID} macro has been corrected to be substituted with the “BidResponse.bidid” attribute.
2015-06
OpenRTB 2.3 (PDF)
The OpenRTB 2.3 specification provides support for native ads. This is one of the most significant updates to OpenRTB as it allows for native ads to be targeted, optimized, and transacted on programmatically, reducing workload on publishers and advertisers alike. Release highlights include:

  • Native ad placements must be included directly into the impression object in order to be passed through the bidstream.
  • Allows for the inclusion of metadata (title, urls, data, img files) in the native request. The buy side now has the ability to describe the unit that’s being bid on and the supply side is able to define which fields are available and required in order to assemble the native ad.
  • Updates to the style of the document including improved diagrams and revamped table format to support the continued commitment to OpenRTB.
2015-01
OpenRTB 2.2 (PDF)
OpenRTB 2.2 provided for improved PMP and non-intentional traffic support. With bot traffic becoming an increasing concern to both the buy and sell sides, OpenRTB 2.2 allows for all parties to be able to provide real-time feedback on ads to determine and block non-human traffic. Release highlights include:

  • Support to the allow for the differentiation of secure and nonsecure inventory.
  • Exhaustive Deal ID support for Private Marketplaces
  • Improved backing for new types of mobile and video inventory
  • Ability for buyers to alert sellers in real time about suspected bot traffic
  • COPPA regulation support
2014-04
OpenRTB 2.1(PDF)OpenRTB 2.1 provided for improved VAST video, tablet and location targeting support. Release highlights include:

  • IAB Tier-2 category support
  • Recognition of tablet inventory
  • VAST video across RTB;  the video object must represent an impression as either banner, video or both
  • Location source support; differentiation of GPS derived and zip code value targeting
2012-10
OpenRTB 2.0(PDF)OpenRTB 2.0 provided unified support for display, mobile, and video capabilities. This was a significant step forward for programmatic as allows for the harmonization of mobile and desktop advertising. Release highlights include:

  • VAST ad unit support
  • Improved geographical data definition
  • Increased cross-channel support for mobile and desktop through a common API language.
  • Improved 3rd party data segment support for audience targeting
  • Enhanced attribution support; inclusion of device IDs in mobile & mobile app parameters
2012-01

Annoying Ads Following You On Web? Rubicon Project May Have A Solution | Ad Age

Annoying Ads Following You On Web? Rubicon Project May Have A Solution; ; In Ad Age; 2016-09=07.

Can Rubicon’s Customizable Ad Filter Make Online Advertising Less Annoying?; Sean Captain; In Fast Company; 2016-12-07.
Teaser: The ad exchange company has a utopian dream: Let people pick the ads they want to see and block out the rest.

Mentioned

  • Project Awesome

Quoted

  • Frank Addante, founder and CEO, Rubicon Project.
  • Shekhar Yadav, SVP of technology, Rubicon Project.

Previously

The hipster is dead, and you might not like who comes next (the YUCCIE) | Mashable

The hipster is dead, and you might not like who comes next; David Infante; In Mashable; 2015-06-09.

tl;dr → YUCCIE = Young Urban Creatives; tries too hard to be funny; winds up writing about [his] privilege.

Similar

Mentions

  • despicable millenn-intelligensia.
  • creative class
  • Generation Y
  • Yuccies = Young Urban Creatives.
  • <quote>They’re social consultants coordinating #sponsored Instagram campaigns for lifestyle brands; they’re brogrammers hawking Uber for weed and Tinder for dogs; they’re boutique entrepreneurs shilling sustainably harvested bamboo sunglasses. </quote>
  • <quote>Ten years ago, “yuccies” might have been “hipsters.” Remember hipsters? Trust fund motorcycle mechanics, rustic barnwood reclaimers, drug-addled graphic designers slinking over the Williamsburg Bridge in the wee hours of the morning. In hipsterism, you can see the development of yuccie hallmarks: DIY entrepreneurship, niche marketing, ability to leverage new technology, etc. </quote>

Referenced

Google’s Project Vault: A Secure Computer On A Micro SD Card | fossBytes (2015)

Google’s Project Vault: A Secure Computer On A Micro SD Card; ; In fossBytes; 2015-05-30.

tl;dr → after the promotion cycle, whatever became of it?

Mentions

  • Google I/O 2015
  • Regina Duggan
  • Project Vault, Google
  • Google ATAP
    a test program. a beta release program

Concept

  • micro SD form factor
  • like a SIM card, owned by Google, not the telecom industry
  • ARM processor
  • ARTos
  • NFC chip
  • something about crypto
  • 2-factor auth
  • Project Vault SDK