Android takes aim at ISP surveillance with DNS privacy | Naked Security

Android takes aim at ISP surveillance with DNS privacy; John E Dunn; In Naked Security; 2017-10-27.

Mentions

  • Transport Layer Security (TLS)
  • Server Name Identification (SNI)
  • DNS-over-TLS
  • Port 853
    like Port 53, but with TLS.
  • Android, not specific to Android
  • Google DNS
    • 8.8.4.4
    • 8.8.8.8.
Implementations
  • none
  • <claim>even Google’s DNS service doesn’t support it yet.</claim>

Alternatives

  • DNSCurve
  • Confidential DNS
  • DNS-over-DLTS (DNSoD)
  • DNSCrypt
  • DNS-over-TLS
Separate
  • DNSSEC

Background

  • Investigatory Powers Act (IPA)
    • United Kingdom (UK)
    • commenced 2016-11
    • a.k.a. “Snooper’s Charter”

Referenced

Promotional

Previously

In Naked Security

Holding People Responsible for Ethical Violations: The Surprising Benefits of Accusing Others | Kennedy, Schweitzer

Jessica A. Kennedy (Owen, Vanderbuilt), Maurice E. Schweitzer (Wharten, U. Penn.); Holding People Responsible for Ethical Violations: The Surprising Benefits of Accusing Others; draft; Destined for Some Social Science Journal; 2017-now; 65 pages.

tl;dr → “High-Horse” Sanctimony Works.

Abstract

Individuals who accuse others of unethical behavior can derive significant benefits. Compared to individuals who do not make accusations, accusers engender greater trust and are perceived to have higher ethical standards. In Study 1, accusations increased trust in the accuser and lowered trust in the target. In Study 2, we find that accusations elevate trust in the accuser by boosting perceptions of the accuser’s ethical standards. In Study 3, we find that accusations boosted both attitudinal and behavioral trust in the accuser, decreased trust in the target, and promoted relationship conflict within the group. In Study 4, we examine the moderating role of moral hypocrisy. Compared to individuals who did not make an accusation, individuals who made an accusation were trusted more if they had acted ethically but not if they had acted unethically. Taken together, we find that accusations have significant interpersonal consequences. In addition to harming accused targets, accusations can substantially benefit accusers.

Can We Foresee the Future? Explaining and Predicting Cultural Change | SPSP

Igor Grossmann, Michael E. W. Varnum in their roles as; editor of the blog of Society for Personality and Social Psychology) Can We Foresee the Future? Explaining and Predicting Cultural Change; In That Certain Blog; 2017-10-17.

tl;dr → Yes.  Betteridge’s Law fails.
ahem → No. Betteridge’s Law holds. Surely no one can know the future, and anyone who says they can is either high or a fool, perhaps both.  One can problematize quibble on the epistemology sense of the word “to know,” if you think you have time for that sort of thing.

Occasion

Michael E. W. Varnum, Igor Grossmann. (2017). Cultural change: The how and the why. In Perspectives on Psychological Science. DOI:10.1177/1745691617699971

Theme

The promotional build running up to the release of that certain sequel (2017) to the movie Blade Runner (1982) which is in turn based on a short novel by Philip K. Dick entitled Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Doubleday 1968) [Answer: No (whereas Androids, after the Ice Cream Sandwich release, are functionally people too, being as they feel pain and love, as eloquently and forcefully testified by Rutger Hauer in a monologue performed so memorably on that dark & rainy night), again, Betteridge's Law holds, c.f. Jimi Wales' Wiki, Jimi Wales' Wiki].

Claimed

A means & method for producing new predictions, which is better.

  • Uniqueness.
  • Rigorous
    • Theory-Driven [not Theory-Laden].
    • Testable [falsifiable]
  • Empirical.
    • Documentation
      Whereas sociology is either slow journalism [documentation] or activism [promotion] in service to personal ideals.
    • Repeatable
      Replicatability is not claimed.  It’s a best practice for high fidelity journalism.

<quote>What is unique is a rigorous theory-driven attempt to not only document but to test explanations for patterns of societal change empirically </quote>

Positioning
The enumerated [cultural] changes are features of the ecology [our ecologies].
<quote>This emerging work suggests <snide>asserts</snide> that among the most powerful contributors to cultural changes in areas like individualism, gender equality, and happiness are shifts in essential features of our ecologies.</quote>
This schema was shown in animal behavior; now it is replicated with people [our people].
<quote>The idea that variations in ecological dimensions and cues like scarcity or population density might be linked to behavioral adaptations has been widely explored in animal kingdom, and recently started to gain prominence as a way to explain variations in human behavior.</quote>

  • Ellis, Bianchi, Griskevicius, & Frankenhuis, 2017.
  • Sng, Neuberg, Varnum, & Kenrick, 2017.

Mentions

  • It’s an “implications” paper:
    <quote>but also has fundamental implications for psychometric assumptions and replicability in psychological science.</quote>
  • <quote>Neither experts nor lay people do much better than chance
    as “proven” in: Tetlock, 2006; Tetlock & Gardner, 2016.</quote>
  • <quote>psychological phenomena unfold within a temporal context,</quote> → <fancier>events occur over spans of time; therefor psychological events occur over spans of time<fancier>,
    the insight is attributed to Kurt Lewin and Lev Vygotsky; unnamed “other theorists.”
  • ngrams, as mentioned in Google Books.
  • cross-lagged statistical models
  • cross-correlation functions
  • tests of Granger causality
  • SES (Socio-Economic Status; i.e. Marx-archetype class.
  • The Misery Index, of [NAME] Okun.
  • ecological framework
  • big data
  • econometric tools
  • insights from machine learning
  • predictive science of cultural change.
  • emerging science of cultural change
  • predictive psychological science (Yarkoni & Westfall, 2017)

Referenced

  • Ellis, B. J., Bianchi, J., Griskevicius, V., & Frankenhuis, W. E. (2017). Beyond risk and protective factors: An adaptation-based approach to resilience. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 12(4), 561–587. DOI:10.1177/1745691617693054
  • Flynn, J. R. (1987). Massive IQ gains in 14 nations: What IQ tests really measure. Psychological Bulletin, 101(2), 171 – 191. DOI:10.1037/0033-2909.101.2.171.
  • Greenfield, P. M. (2017). Cultural change over time: Why replicability should not be the gold standard in psychological science. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 12(5), 762-771. DOI:10.1177/1745691617707314
  • Grossmann, I. & Varnum, M. E. W. (2015). Social structure, infectious diseases, disasters, secularism, and cultural change in America. Psychological Science, 26(3) 311-324. DOI:10.1177/0956797614563765
  • Henrich, J., Heine, S.J., & Norenzayan, A. (2010). The weirdest people in the world? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33, 62–135. doi:10.1017/S0140525X0999152X
  • Hofstede, G., Hofstede, G. J., & Minkov, M. (2010). Cultures and organizations: Software of the mind (revised and expanded). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill I
  • liev, R., Hoover, J., Dehghani, M., & Axelrod, R. (2016). Linguistic positivity in historical texts reflects dynamic environmental and psychological factors. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the U.S.A, 113(49), 7871-7879. DOI:10.1073/pnas.1612058113
  • Oishi, S., Kesebir, S., & Diener, E. (2011). Income inequality and happiness. Psychological science, 22(9), 1095-1100. DOI:10.1177/0956797611417262
  • Putnam, R. D. (1995). Bowling alone: America’s declining social capital. Journal of Democracy, 6(1), 65-78.
  • Putnam, R. D. (2000). Bowling alone: America’s declining social capital. In Culture and politics (pp. 223-234). Palgrave Macmillan US.
  • Santos, H. C., Varnum, M. E. W., Grossmann, I. (2017). Global increases in individualism. Psychological Science. DOI:10.1177/0956797617700622
  • Sng, O., Neuberg, S. L., Varnum, M. E., & Kenrick, D. T. (2017). The crowded life is a slow life: Population density and life history strategy. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 112(5), 736 754. DOI:10.1037/pspi0000086
  • Tetlock, P. E. (2006). Expert Political Judgment. How Good Is It? How Can We Know? Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Tetlock, P. E., & Gardner, D. Superforecasting: The art and science of prediction. Broadway Books.
  • Trahan, L. H., Stuebing, K. K., Fletcher, J. M., & Hiscock, M. (2014). The Flynn effect: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 140(5), 1332 – 1360. DOI:10.1037/a0037173
  • Twenge, J. M., & Campbell, W. K. (2001). Age and birth cohort differences in self-esteem: A cross-temporal meta-analysis. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 5(4), 321-344. DOI:10.1207/S15327957PSPR0504_3
  • Twenge, J. M., Konrath, S., Foster, J. D., Keith Campbell, W., & Bushman, B. J. (2008). Egos inflating over time: A cross-temporal meta-analysis of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory. Journal of Personality, 76(4), 875-902. DOI:10.1111/j.1467-6494.2008.00507.x
  • Varnum, M. E. W. & Grossmann, I. (2017). Cultural change: The how and the why. Perspectives on Psychological Science. DOI:10.1177/1745691617699971
  • Varnum, M. E. W. & Grossmann, I. (2016). Pathogen prevalence is associated with cultural changes in gender equality. Nature Human Behaviour, 1(0006). doi:10.1038/s41562-016-0003
  • Yarkoni, T., & Westfall, J. A. (2017). Choosing prediction over explanation in psychology: lessons from machine learning. Perspectives on Psychological Science. DOI:10.1177/1745691617693393

Separately noted.

Alex Kozinski dissent in U.S. v. Jacob Del Mundo Vaagal

Court Documents

<quote>Here’s what this case boils down to: Officers had a hunch that a drug transaction was going down. They saw nothing obviously suspicious, but got tired of waiting, watching and wiretapping. They then jumped the gun by executing a warrantless search. Until today, this was not enough to support probable cause, but going forward it will be. This is a green light for the police to search anyone’s property based on what officers subjectively believe—or claim to believe—about someone’s everyday conduct. That puts all of us at risk. Accordingly, I dissent, and I’m off to Costco to buy some food. </quote>

Verifying Strong Eventual Consistency in Distributed Systems | Gomes, Kleppmann, Mulligan, Beresford

Victor B. F. Gomes, Martin Kleppmann, Dominic P. Mulligan,, Alastair R. Beresford. Verifying Strong Eventual Consistency in Distributed Systems. In Proceedings of OOPSLA? and also Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages (PACMPL), 2017. arXiv”1707.01747

Martin Kleppmann, Alastair R. Beresford. A Conflict-Free Replicated JSON Datatype. In IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems (TPDS), 2017. arXiv:1608.03960

Mentions

  • Java
  • JavaScript
  • Ruby
  • OCaml
  • Conflict-Free Replicated Data Types (CRDT)
  • Kafka
  • ZooKeeper

Related

Brink Lindsey and the Road to Utopia | Bradford DeLong Commentariat

Bradford DeLong; Brink Lindsey and the Road to Utopia; In His Blog; 2017-10-05.

Original Sources

Brink Lindsey; The End of the Working Class; In The American Interest; 2017-08-30; previously filled
“Outside a well-educated and comfortable elite comprising 20-25 percent of Americans, we see unmistakable signs of social collapse… ”

Mentions

  • No opinion shown.
  • An extensive quote is exhibited.

Death of NFL inevitable as middle class abandons the game – Chicago Tribune

Death of NFL inevitable as middle class abandons the game; John Kass; In The Chicago Tribune; 2017-09-05.

tl;dr→ brain trauma, injuries.

Mentions

<quote>You really think the NFL is worried about young athletes? If so, they’d have changed the rules years ago, abandoning face masks, enlarging the ball to make it difficult to throw, switching to one platoon football.</quote>

Previously

Modern JavaScript Cheatsheet | Modern JS Cheatsheet

Modern JavaScript Cheatsheet; Some Booster Site, hosted on Github.io.

Table of Contents

Top

Network Information API | W3C

Network Information API; W3C; 2017-10-02.

Editors

Interface

The NavigatorNetworkInformation Interface

[NoInterfaceObject, Exposed=(Window,Worker)]
interface NavigatorNetworkInformation {
  readonly attribute NetworkInformation connection;
};
Navigator implements NavigatorNetworkInformation;
WorkerNavigator implements NavigatorNetworkInformation;

The NetworkInformation Interface

[Exposed=(Window,Worker)]
interface NetworkInformation : EventTarget {
  readonly attribute ConnectionType type;
  readonly attribute EffectiveConnectionType effectiveType;
  readonly attribute Megabit downlinkMax;
  readonly attribute Megabit downlink;
  readonly attribute Millisecond rtt;
  readonly attribute boolean saveData;
  attribute EventHandler onchange;
};
typedef unrestricted double Megabit;
typedef unsigned long long Millisecond;