The Death of Rules and Standards | Casey, Niblett

Anthony J. Casey, Anthony Niblett; The Death of Rules and Standards; Coase-Sandor Working Paper Series in Law and Economics No. 738; Law School, University of Chicago; 2015; 58 pages; landing, copy, ssrn:2693826, draft.

Abstract

Scholars have examined the lawmakers’ choice between rules and standards for decades. This paper, however, explores the possibility of a new form of law that renders that choice unnecessary. Advances in technology (such as big data and artificial intelligence) will give rise to this new form – the micro-directive – which will provide the benefits of both rules and standards without the costs of either.

Lawmakers will be able to use predictive and communication technologies to enact complex legislative goals that are translated by machines into a vast catalog of simple commands for all possible scenarios. When an individual citizen faces a legal choice, the machine will select from the catalog and communicate to that individual the precise context-specific command (the micro-directive) necessary for compliance. In this way, law will be able to adapt to a wide array of situations and direct precise citizen behavior without further legislative or judicial action. A micro-directive, like a rule, provides a clear instruction to a citizen on how to comply with the law. But, like a standard, a micro-directive is tailored to and adapts to each and every context.

While predictive technologies such as big data have already introduced a trend toward personalized default rules, in this paper we suggest that this is only a small part of a larger trend toward context- specific laws that can adapt to any situation. As that trend continues, the fundamental cost trade-off between rules and standards will disappear, changing the way society structures and thinks about law.

Separately noted.

Plan for More Secure, Reliable Wi-Fi Routers – and Internet | Internet Society et al.

Global Internet Experts Reveal Plan for More Secure, Reliable Wi-Fi Routers – and Internet; press release; Internet Society; 2015-10-14.
Teaser: Letter to FCC Requests Mandates for Securing and Updating Wi-Fi Devices

Original Sources

Referenced

Concept

<quote>

  1. Any vendor of software-defined radio (SDR), wireless, or Wi-Fi radio must make public the full and maintained source code for the device driver and radio firmware in order to maintain FCC compliance. The source code should be in a buildable, change-controlled source code repository on the Internet, available for review and improvement by all.
  2. The vendor must assure that secure update of firmware be working at time of shipment, and that update streams be under ultimate control of the owner of the equipment. Problems with compliance can then be fixed going forward by the person legally responsible for the router being in compliance.
  3. The vendor must supply a continuous stream of source and binary updates that must respond to regulatory transgressions and Common Vulnerability and Exposure reports (CVEs) within 45 days of disclosure, for the warranted lifetime of the product, or until five years after the last customer shipment, whichever is longer.
  4. Failure to comply with these regulations should result in FCC decertification of the existing product and, in severe cases, bar new products from that vendor from being considered for certification.
  5. Additionally, we ask the FCC to review and rescind any rules for anything that conflicts with open source best practices, produce unmaintainable hardware, or cause vendors to believe they must only ship undocumented “binary blobs” of compiled code or use lockdown mechanisms that forbid user patching. This is an ongoing problem for the Internet community committed to best practice change control and error correction on safety-critical systems.

</quote>

Open source IoT alliance taps Qualcomm AllJoyn | LinuxGizmos

Eric Brown; Open source IoT alliance taps Qualcomm AllJoyn; In LinuxGizmos; 2013-12-10.

Original Sources

  • Qualcomm’s AllJoyn
  • Alljoyn.org
  • AllSeen Alliance
  • AllJoyn
  • Other Home Automation Frameworks
  • <quote>AllJoyn is written in C++, with multiple language bindings including Java, and supported with an open source SDK and APIs. The stack is “not just” a low-level communications protocol, but capable of solving “higher-level problems,” says the alliance. Designed to span physical layers and “bridge ecosystems,” AllJoyn is said to react to dynamic, ad-hoc network changes, enabling connections to persist as devices join and depart. </quote>

Actualities