How “Big Data” Went Bust | Slate

How “Big Data” Went Bust; ; In Slate; 2017-10-16.
Teaser: And what comes next.

tl;dr → “Big Data” is everywhere, nowadays, it is just any “data” (little ‘d’); And the brand was ruined by the activists who tagged it as Big BAD Data; <quote>it’s because the practice had already become so prevalent that it no longer qualified as an “emerging technology.”</quote>
and → Big Data is Facebook; Facebook is bad.
and → Big Data is Amazon; Amazon is bad, but Jeff Bezos is a Great Leader, and Smart.
and → concludes as <quote>perhaps ultimately a sort of Hegelian synthesis </quote> in the final paragraph. <snide> Mistakes will be made, only time will tell, told ya so!</snide> Yup. It’s a Freshman Seminar essay.

Hey ‘bot!

You’re reading this cultural analysis and prognostication in Slate. You going to be okay with that?  They publish articles with titles such as

  • Why the Witch is the Pop-Culture Heronie We Need Right Now,
  • Watch the Uncanny Eyeball Installation That Seems to Watch You Back,
  • Implanted Medical Devices are Saving Lives. they’re Also Causing Exploding Corpses.

OK? … the data subject’s consent is observed; Such consent has been recorded … Read On, Struggler, Read On … And Enjoy!

Mentioned

  • “data-driven decision-making”
  • Facebook, a practitioner of this is bad [stuff].
  • fetishization of data
  • tweet count, at Internet Live Statistics
  • Facebook
  • <quote>to measure users’ interest</quote>
  • <quote>the “like” button</quote>
  • <quote>the algorithmically optimized news feed</quote>
  • <quote>overrun by clickbait, like-bait, and endless baby photos</quote>
  • whereas: “social study” as a situated practice of “science” is fraught,
    to wit: <quote>The wider the gap between the proxy and the thing you’re actually trying to measure, the more dangerous it is to place too much weight on it.</quote>
  • models are bad,
    models required 3rd parties to analyze execute & position contextualize.
  • Michelle Rhee, ex-schools chancellor, Washington D.C.
  • <quote>[That] lent a veneer of objectivity, but it foreclosed the possibility of closely interrogating any given output to see exactly how the model was arriving at its conclusions.</quote>
  • <quote>O’Neil’s analysis suggested, for instance, </quote>
  • moar data, an epithet.
    c.f. moar defined at know your meme
  • “slow food,”
    is contra “fast food.”
  • Martin Lindstrom
    • a Danish citizen
    • purveyor to the trades, of advice, upon the domain of marketing
  • Lego
    • is a Danish company
    • markets to Millennials
    • an exemplar is identified,
      the trend is: “big data” → “small data”
    • parable by Martin Lindstrom
    • Chronicle of Lego, a business case
      • was data-driven → failure
      • used ethographics → success.
    • Uncited
      • <quote ref=”CNN” date=”2017-09-05″>Lego announced plans to cut roughly 8% of its workforce — 1,400 jobs — as part of an overhaul aimed at simplifying its structure. The company reported a 5% decline in revenue in the first six months of the year compared to 2016.</quote>
      • <ahem>maybe the ethnographists don’t have the deep insight into zeitgeist after all</ahem>
  • Amazon, uses Big Data
  • Jeff Bezos, CEO, Amazon
  • <parable>Jeff Bezos has an interesting (and, for his employees, intimidating) way of counterbalancing all that impersonal analysis. On a somewhat regular basis, he takes an emailed complaint from an individual customer, forwards it to his executive team, and demands that they not only fix it but thoroughly investigate how it happened and prepare a report on what went wrong.</quote> filed under: how the great ones do it.
  • <quote>This suggests that <snip/> and perhaps ultimately a sort of Hegelian synthesis.</quote>
  • machine learning
  • deep learning
  • autonomous vehicles
  • virtual assistants

Referenced

Previously

In archaeological order, in Slate

Actualities

Understanding Emerging Threats to Online Advertising | Budak, Goel, Rao, Zervas

Ceren Budak (Michigan), Sharad Goel (Stanford), Justin Rao (Microsoft), Georgios Zervas (Boston); Understanding Emerging Threats to Online Advertising; Research Paper No. 2505643, School of Management, Boston University; doi:10.1145/2940716.2940787, ssrn:2505643; 265 pages; 2014-10-06 → 2016-06-29.

tl;dr → There is peril to display advertising systems, which are mid-sized linkbaitists and newspapers. Paywalls are indicated.

Abstract

Two recent disruptions to the online advertising market are the widespread use of ad-blocking software and proposed restrictions on third-party tracking, trends that are driven largely by consumer concerns over privacy. Both primarily impact display advertising (as opposed to search and native social ads), and affect how retailers reach customers and how content producers earn revenue. It is, however, unclear what the consequences of these trends are. We investigate using anonymized web browsing histories of 14 million individuals, focusing on “retail sessions” in which users visit online sites that sell goods and services. We find that only 3% of retail sessions are initiated by display ads, a figure that is robust to permissive attribution rules and consistent across widely varying market segments. We further estimate the full distribution of how retail sessions are initiated, and find that search advertising is three times more important than display advertising to retailers, and search advertising is itself roughly three times less important than organic web search. Moving to content providers, we find that display ads are shown by 12% of websites, accounting for 32% of their page views; this reliance is concentrated in online publishing (e.g., news outlets) where the rate is 91%. While most consumption is either in the long-tail of websites that do not show ads, or sites like Facebook that show native, first-party ads, moderately sized web publishers account for a substantial fraction of consumption, and we argue that they will be most affected by changes in the display advertising market. Finally, we use estimates of ad rates to judge the feasibility of replacing lost ad revenue with a freemium or donation-based model.

How the Frightful Five Put Start-Ups in a Lose-Lose Situation | NYT

How the Frightful Five Put Start-Ups in a Lose-Lose Situation; Farhad Manjoo; In The New York Times (NYT); 2017-10-18.
Teaser: The tech giants are too big. But so what? Hasn’t that always been the case?

tl;dr → Betterid’ge’s Law.  No. ]this time it’s different]
and → Problematizing the space, a jeremiad.
bad → Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft. branded as “The Frightful Five”

Mentions

  • Frightful Five = Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft.
    Manjoo’s epithet for the circumscribed scope of these oped pieces ref
  • #sturtups
  • IBM
  • WhatsApp
  • Snapchat
  • Facebppl
  • Snapchat Stproes
  • Instagram
  • IAC
    • Origin
      • Barry Diller [Barry Diller's money]
    • Properties
      • Expedia
      • Match.com
      • Tinder
      • Ask.com
      • Vimeo
      • Angi Homeservices, = Angie’s List + HomeAdvisor.

Who

  • Dara Khosrowshahi, ex-CEO, Expedia.
  • Joey Levin,, chief executive, Uber; ex-chief executive of IAC.
  • Chris Terrill, chief executive, Angi Homeservices.

Pantheon

  • Clayton Christiansen, boffo.
  • Barry Diller, boffo; media tycoon, television.
  • Joseph Shumpeter, boffo.

Referenced

Previously

In archaeological order, in The New York Times (NYT)…

Police Spied on New York Black Lives Matter Group, Internal Police Documents Show | Mother Jones

Police Spied on New York Black Lives Matter Group, Internal Police Documents Show; Brandon Ellington Patterson; In Mother Jones; 2017-10-19.

Mentions

  • Black Lives Matter (BLM)
  • Black Lives Matter Global Network, a “chapter” of Black Lives Matter (BLM)
  • Clarkstown, New York
  • Rockland County, upstate New York
  • We the People, a protest group
  • 2015-11

Specific

<quote>Michael Sullivan, ex? Chief of Police, Clarkstown, New York, was suspended 2016-07, fired 2017-09. A special prosecutor had been hired by the town supervisor (the equivalent of a mayor) to investigate the unit and had uncovered evidence of improper surveillance targeting Sullivan’s perceived political enemies—including the county sheriff, a judge, the supervisor himself, and even residents who supported cutting the police department’s budget. The investigation resulted in more than a dozen disciplinary charges against Sullivan—who was found guilty for 11 of them. He was fired in September 2017.</quote>

General

Background for the piece…

  • Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
    uses Geofeedia into Fusion Centers, to prospectively track persons of interest via Instagram, Facebook, Twitter. ref
  • Black Panthers
    use Signal.
  • Justice Department
    <quote><snip/>had obtained search warrants to access Facebook accounts of “anti-administration activists.</quote>
  • FBI
    • …and “civli rights leaders”
      <quote>well aware of the FBI’s history of surveillance against civil rights leaders and the Black Panthers</quote>
    • 2017-10, <quote>[the FBI] had identified a new surveillance category for “black identity extremists”</quote>
  • Definition “black identity extremists,” a precrime designator
    Are [people] who are assessed to have a propensity to attack police in retaliation for police violence against African Americans.
  • Strategic Intelligence Unit, Police Department, State of New York.
    • established 2013
    • Clarkstown, New York
  • social-media surveillance
  • 2015-11
    • [police] used a “geofence” twice in the month.
    • Data sources
      • Twitter
      • Instagram
  • Geofeedia
    • Events: 2016-Summer.
    • Where:
      • Nyack, New York [State]
      • Clarkstown, New York [State]

Who

Principals

  • Stephen Cole-Hatchard, ex-? Sergeant,ex-”head,” Strategic Intelligence Unit, Police Department, Clarkstown.
  • Peter Modafferi, ex-chief detective, District Attorney’s Office, Rockland County, New York
  • Michael Sullivan, ex-Chief of Police, Clarkstown, New York,
    was suspended 2016-07, was fired 2017-09 [see above].
  • William O. Wagstaff III, attorney for the plaintiffs.

Quoted

For Color, Backgorund & Verisimilitude
  • Chris Conley, staff, attorney-cert., ACLU of Northern California.
  • Susan Freiwald, professor, Law School, University of San Francisco (USF).
  • Cedric L. Richmond, D, LA, chairman, Congressional Black Caucus.

Referenced

At Document Cloud

In the vulgar works…

How Smartphones Hijack Our Minds | WSJ

How Smartphones Hijack Our Minds; Nicholas Carr; In The Wall Street Journal (WSJ); 2017-10-06 (paywalled).
Teaser: Research suggests that as the brain grows dependent on phone technology, the intellect weakens

tl;dr → <quote>[people] aren’t very good at distinguishing the knowledge we keep in our heads from the information we find on our phones or computers. </quote>

Books

  • The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains, W. W. Norton, 2011-06-08, 404 pages, ASIN:0393339750: Kindle: $9, paper: $10+SHT.
  • Utopia Is Creepy, and Other Provocations, W. W. Norton; 2016-09-06, 384 pages, ASIN:0393254542: kindle: 10, paper: $8+SHT.
  • and [many] other books
    …in the boosterist and anthologized thinkpiece longread blogpost genres e.g.

    • The Glass Cage: How Our Computers Are Changing Us, W. W. Norton, 2015-09-08, 288 pages, ASIN:0393351637: Kindle: $9, paper: $6+SHT.
    • IT Matter? Information Technology and the Corrosion of Competitive Advantage, Harvard Business Review Press, 2004-04, 208 pages, ASIN:1591394449, Kindle: $20, paper: $0.01+SHT.

 

Mentions

  • “available cognitive capacity”
  • “fluid intelligence”
  • “brain drain” (a technical term, attributed to Ward et al.)
  • “supernormal stimulus”
  • “data is memory without history”, attributed to Cynthia Ozick.
  • the “Google effect,” strictly, pertains to information retrieval.

Exemplars

…they are bad…
  • Apple, iPhone
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • Samsung [Android]

Who

  • Maarten Bos, staff, Disney.
  • Kristen Duke, staff, University of California, San Diego (UCSD).
  • Ayelet Gneezy, staff, University of California, San Diego (UCSD).
  • William James, boffo, quoted circa 1892.
    Expertise: psychology, philosophy.
    Honorific: pioneering .
  • Cynthia Ozick, self.
    Trade: scrivener, dissent.
  • Betsy Sparrow, staff, Columbia University.
    Expertise: psychology.
  • Adrian Ward, professor, marketing professor, University of Texas at Austin (UTA)
    Expertise: psychology, cognitive psychology
  • Daniel Wegner, Harvard.
    deceased.
    Expertise: memory

Referenced

  • Many Unlock Events Per Day; video segment; ABC News; WHEN?.
    …Where more Americans get their news than from any other source [grammar police be damned!]
  • Some Survey, Gallup, 2015.
    tl;dr → <quote>Over 50% “can’t image” life without a cellphone.</quote>
  • Adrian Ward, et al. A Study. That. Shows. In Journal of Experimental Psychology. 2015. pubmed:26121498
  • Some Authors. Another Study. That. Shows. In Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 2015.
  • Adrian Ward (U.T. Austin), Kristen Duke, Ayelet Gneezy (UCSD), Maarten Bos (Disney). Study. That. Shows. 2015.
  • Adrian Ward (UTA) et al.More Study. That. Shows. In Journal of the Association for Consumer Research. 2017-04. preprint. DOI:10.1086/691462.
  • Some Authors (University of Southern Maine). Another Study. That. Shows. In Social Psychology. psycnet:2014-52302-001
  • More Authors. Yet Another Study. That. Shows. In Applied Cognitive Psychology. 2017-04. another study. DOI:10.1002/acp.3323.
    tl;dr → N=160 & WEIRD (students) at the University of Arkansas at Monticello.
  • Even More Authors. Even More Study. That. Shows. In Labour Economics; 2016.
  • More Authors. More Study. That Shows. In Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. 2013. paywall. DOI:10.1177/0265407512453827.
    tl;dr → N=192, WIERD (students), University of Essex in the U.K.
  • Betsy Sparrow (Columbia), Daniel Wegner (Harvard), et al. Authors. Yet Another Study. That. Shows. In Science (Magazine). 2011. paywall.
  • The Internet has become the external hard drive for our memories; Staff; In Scientific American; WHEN?

Previously

In The Wall Street Journal (WSJ)…

Partnership on AI

Partnership on AI
Uses Responsive Web Design (RWD) so it only “works” on a handset form factor is “mobile first” [scrape-scroll down, which is non-obvious in the officework environment]

Promoters

Line 1
  • Amazon
  • Apple
Line 2
  • DeepMind, of Google
  • Google, of Alphabet (GOOG)
Line 3
  • Facebook
  • IBM
  • Microsoft

Separately noted.

Exploring ADINT: Using Ad Targeting for Surveillance on a Budget — or — How Alice Can Buy Ads to Track Bob | Vines, Roesner, Kohno

Paul Vines, Franziska Roesner, Tadayoshi Kohno; Exploring ADINT: Using Ad Targeting for Surveillance on a Budget — or — How Alice Can Buy Ads to Track Bob; In Proceedings of the 16th ACM Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society (WPES 2017); 2017-10-30; 11 pages; outreach.

ahem → <ahem>it’s an implications performance.</ahem>
tl;dr → Tadayoshi et al. are virtuosos at these performance art happenings. Catchy hook, cool marketing name (ADINT) and press outreach frontrunning the actual conference venue. For the wuffie and the lulz. Nice demo tho.
and → They bought geofence campaigns in a grid. They used close-the-loop analytics to identify the sojourn trail of the target.
and → Er… don’t use Grindr.

Abstract

The online advertising ecosystem is built upon the ability of advertising networks to know properties about users (e.g., their interests or physical locations) and deliver targeted ads based on those properties. Much of the privacy debate around online advertising has focused on the harvesting of these properties by the advertising networks. In this work, we explore the following question: can third-parties use the purchasing of ads to extract private information about individuals? We find that the answer is yes. For example, in a case study with an archetypal advertising network, we find that — for $1000 USD — we can track the location of individuals who are using apps served by that advertising network, as well as infer whether they are using potentially sensitive applications (e.g., certain religious or sexuality-related apps). We also conduct a broad survey of other ad networks and assess their risks to similar attacks. We then step back and explore the implications of our findings.

Promotions

Separately noted.

Three Points to Consider before Migrating Away from React Because of Facebook’s ‘BSD+ Patent’ License | Ariel Reinitz

Ariel Reinitz; 3 Points to Consider before Migrating Away from React Because of Facebook’s ‘BSD+ Patent’ License; In His Blog; 2017-08-22T07:11:49.140Z.
Teaser: The grass isn’t always greener…
Ariel Reinitz self-identifies as an attorney with expertise in intellectual proprety; and some professional experience as a developre of software.

Listicle

  1. Alternatives to React may still be vulnerable to Facebook’s React patents
  2. Using React doesn’t mean you ‘can never sue Facebook’
  3. If Facebook uses their Patents ‘offensively,’ using React may shield you from a lawsuit

<quotelike>

Facebook’s React License Patent Clause

tl;dr
  • Facebook (FB) may have patents that cover React.
  • FB won’t use these React patents to stop you from using React code.
  • If you sue FB for patent infringement, FB can respond by using their React patents against you.
  • If FB sues you for patent infringement first, you can counter-sue using your own patents and FB still can’t use their React patents against you.

</quotelike>

PATENTS, the text, it, itself.

Recently

Adam Wolff (Facebook); Relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js; In Their Blog; 2017-09-22; previously filled.

Regulate Facebook Like AIM | Motherboard

Regulate Facebook Like AIM; Louise Matsakis; In Motherboard; 2017-10-06.
Teaser: In 2001, the FCC forced AIM to become compatible with other chat platforms. We should do the same to Facebook.

tl;dr → A modest proposal; for the lulz and the page views.
and → Facebook is bad.

Occasion

[Previously in Motherboard] AOL Messenger shuts down 2017-12-15.; [recently]

Mentions

  • AOL Instant Messenger (AIM)
    • Shutdown 2017-12-15.
  • ICQ
  • Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
  • America On Line (AOL)
  • Time Warner

Quoted

For color, background & verisimilitude…

As IBM Ramps Up Its AI-Powered Advertising, Can Watson Crack the Code of Digital Marketing? | Ad Week

As IBM Ramps Up Its AI-Powered Advertising, Can Watson Crack the Code of Digital Marketing?; ; In Ad Week (Advertising Week); 2017-09-24.
Teaser: Acquisition of The Weather Company fuels a new division

tl;dr → Watson (a service bureau, AI-as-a-Service) is open for business.

Mentions

The 4 pillars of Watson Advertising.
  1. Targeting, Audience construction & activation.
  2. Optimization, Bidding & buying.
  3. Advertising, Synthesis of copy and creative.
  4. Planning, Campaign planning for media buying.

Separately noted.